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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

So, it’s happened. DEADPOOL is out, and it’s huge. Massive box office. A grade A CinemaScore from fans. Critical praise from…critics. Sequel already getting worked on.

With Wade Wilson the current king of superheroes, and taking the throne by being fresh, brash, and butchering the very genre he lives within, you may think that the sequel will push the envelope even further. Well, not so fast. 

The DEADPOOL comics are known for being very off-the-wall, with storylines that can be downright deranged and/or utterly silly. While the film certainly dabbled in those areas, it still primarily stuck to a fairly tried-and-true foundation. Writers Paul Wernick and Rhett Reese were careful to not go too far too quickly, since they have to first make people fall in love with Deadpool before he can come home and pee on the family dog.

In a chat with Cinema Blend, Wernick talks about this philosophy, and how it will pertain to future sequels:

“I think some things work better in a comic than it might on screen. That’s not to say we can’t explore some of these crazier things, but whether you’re talking about a severed head that’s talking, or Squirrel Girl, or any of the number of crazy things that have happened, I think we just have to be careful to take baby steps into territory like that and not get too crazy too quickly. We’ve got to lead a broader audience slowly down that road and I think if you were to look two or three movies down the road, you’re probably going to see a lot crazier stuff than you’re going to see in this movie number two necessarily. So I think we’ll push it for sure. We’re certainly not shy about pushing the envelope.”

This may come as sad news for fans hoping the character would really let his freak flag fly in DEADPOOL II, but it is an understandable strategy.

SOURCE: Cinema Blend

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.