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The Marvel Cinematic Universe is one complex beast. Each film is supposed to stand alone, all while still contributing to the overall character and story arcs. Sure, any Joe Schmoe can watch and enjoy IRON MAN 3, but it’s much more impactful if you’ve seen THE AVENGERS. Similarly, most anyone can enjoy the actions and events in CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR, but it’ll mean a hell of a lot more to you if you’ve seen most — if not all — of the other MCU films.

While connections between these films are often quite nebulous, other times, they’re quite important. The arc that Captain America has in CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER is crucial to us understanding his motivations in CIVIL WAR, and as such, it becomes more and more difficult for the writers to incorporate these details into their script.

Screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely already have a gargantuan task on their hands in penning the scripts for AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR PARTS 1 & 2, but it certainly doesn’t help that much of Phase 3 of the MCU (which all lead up to INFINITY WAR) has yet to happen. One has to wonder how they’re able to complete a draft of the script without knowing the journeys all the characters will go on in their solo adventures. Has Marvel really mapped things out so well that they don’t have to worry about it?

Not at all. In a recent interview with CinemaBlend, the two screenwriters opened up about their approach, and how much they really don’t know about the films leading up to INFINITY WAR.

“Stephen McFeely: Some of it is informed guesswork. Some of it is constantly pestering people who are makingthose [other] movies to tell us what they’re doing. And sometimes it is us going, ‘It would be massively beneficial if this person could be in this place at the end of your movie. I don’t care what he does in your movie, but by the end of it…’

Christopher Markus: And you know, we write it, we assume when we write it and rewrite it and rewrite it, as more information comes in, we will be adjusting. When we’re turning in the first draft, it’s absolutely that, a first draft, and we’ll go through a lot before we get to November.”

This goes to show that even in the Marvel universe, there is no such thing as a final draft. Film is a very malleable medium, and as such, last-minute changes are always an inevitability.

Well, these two writers have proven their talent in the past, so there’s no reason to think they’ll drop the ball on this one. I, for one, love this bit of insight into their process. As much as we think of Marvel as this big machine, it’s always a good reminder that these films are actually made by people.

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SOURCE: CinemaBlend