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– by Nick Doll

King Kong has had his fair share of screen-time over the decades. Kong was introduced to the world in 1933’s King Kong, followed by sequels, remakes, and even a monstrous crossover event in 1962, King Kong Vs. Godzilla. This month saw the release of Kong: Skull Island, featuring not only the world’s favorite Monkey, but also an ecosystem of monsters and a large cast of humans who don’t want to be eaten, smashed, or ripped limb from limb. In fact, the film seems to put less emphasis on Kong than any other project carrying his name, allowing these new creatures and characters some significant screen-time of their own.

Kong: Skull Island is actually the 2nd film in Legendary Picture’s “MonsterVerse,” kicked off in 2014 with the most recent remake of Godzilla. With Godzilla: King Of The Monsters coming up next in 2019 and a modern Godzilla vs. Kong set for release in 2020, there will be many opportunities to bring back some of these monsters… or men.

The director of Kong: Skull Island, Jordan Vogt-Roberts, has a personal favorite he would like to spin-off into a new film.  This all being the MonsterVerse, it may surprise you that this character is not one of the many monsters featured. Vogt-Roberts told Cinemablend in an interview:

“I mean, all people are fucking excited about the idea for Kong and Godzilla and Rodan and all those creatures clashing. I don’t exactly know where the world’s plans are. In fact, I keep joking that personally I’m more interested in doing a $30 million version of young John C. Reilly on the island. Just some weird, the odd-ball monster comedy with him and Gunpei. So I don’t really know where they’d take it from here.”

In case you have yet to see Kong: Skull Island, John C. Reilly plays Hank Marlow, a man who is stranded on Skull Island long before our other leads set foot on the island. Vogt-Roberts also mentions Gunpei, an enemy of Marlow’s, turned friend. Marlow really is the heart and the soul of the film. In a movie that has so many human characters, it is difficult to tell who we are really rooting for until we meet Marlow. He’s likable, provides some great comedic relief, and is our guide to all the horrors of the island. 

It is true that most people would rather get all the way to Mechagodzilla before they would watch a film about John C. Reilly’s character, but I am on board, Mr. Vogt-Roberts! Even with the more human-sized budget suggested, it is unlikely John C. Reilly will anchor another MonsterVerse film, but a fan can dream, right?

What about you? Would you pay to see the adventures of Marlow and Gunpei? Anyone want to see “Log Monster” return so that the pair have a place to sit?

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Source: CinemaBlend