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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

We live in a digital era. The majority of movies and TV shows we watch nowadays are shot digitally and let’s be honest, the majority of folks can’t tell the difference between digital and film. Additionally, we also live in an era of CG sets and effects.

RELATED: Murder On The Orient Express Gets 16 Character Posters

With his next film, Murder on the Orient Express, director Kenneth Branagh is aiming to do something reverential of the medium. In a new featurette, he discusses their use of film, and while it doesn’t say it in the video itself, the camera they’re using is, in fact, one of the last four 65mm cameras in existence.

“We wanted to bring the full experience to the audience, so I shot on film. It essentially means it looks sharper, richer, more colorful, and it feels like you’re inside it.”

With this film, it sounds like they also took pains to ensure it felt as real and tangible as possible.

“Everything feels real. Everything is practical,” Josh Gad said.

Of course, that’s not to say EVERYTHING is practical, just mostly the set design. Even in the video we’re able to see a bit of green screen use. But the sentiment is still there.

What starts out as a lavish train ride through Europe quickly unfolds into one of the most stylish, suspenseful and thrilling mysteries ever told. From the novel by best selling author Agatha Christie, Murder on the Orient Express tells the tale of thirteen strangers stranded on a train, where everyone’s a suspect. One man must race against time to solve the puzzle before the murderer strikes again.

Murder on the Orient Express hits theaters on November 10, 2017.

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SOURCE: 20th Century Fox

  • David E

    As a huge Poirot fan, and a fan of this kind of movie, I cannot wait for this.

  • Venomaide

    Im jealous of that stache

  • Moby85

    The trailer looked decent enough. I don’t think people necessarily hate CGI as much as being touted. But what’s happened is a bunch of studios, primarily overseas, have got in on the action that are 15+ years behind what the best studios, such as ILM and Weta, are doing. And it really, really shows. Budget CGI pales in comparison to what *can* be done for special effects and audiences know it.

    I would argue that state-of-the-art CGI effects: Michael Douglas’ de-aging in Ant-Man, and Rachel in Blade Runner 2049, still wow audiences.

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University’s Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer’s always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he’s always been something of a story junkie.