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– by Nick Doll

Why aren’t the movies in the DC Extended Universe as good as Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy? Yes, Nolan is one of the best directors working today, with an eye for story, theme, and large-scale practical visuals matched by almost no one. But, surely there are other directors capable of making good films for the DCEU, even if Nolan won’t get involved past his producing credits.

Nolan pointed out a key difference between the way Warner Bros allowed him to make his trilogy vs. the current process in churning out superhero films to Deadline:

“That’s a privilege and a luxury that filmmakers aren’t afforded anymore. I think it was the last time that anyone was able to say to a studio, ‘I might do another one, but it will be four years’. There’s too much pressure on release schedules to let people do that now but creatively it’s a huge advantage. We had the privilege and advantage to develop as people and as storytellers and then bring the family back together.”

Though Marvel has been very successful picking release dates and sticking to them, while still delivering great films, Nolan has a point. After each Batman film, he took months to decide if he even wanted to do another, and then made them at his own pace. So, instead of releasing a film every year or even every other year, as most trilogies seem to do, there was a three year gap between 2005’s Batman Begins and 2008’s The Dark Knight, with four years between the middle chapter and The Dark Knight Rises.

Do you think Nolan is onto something? Are superhero films too rushed these days, or does this not seem to matter much? Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below!

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SOURCE: Deadline

  • Kevin Motionworkscinema Knight

    Chris come back and direct another trilogy which includes a grounded in reality Justice league and Batman movies. Pleaseeeeee!!!!

  • Bruce Norris

    Creatively, I don’t think it matters. Most films are made with “franchise” in mind. Question is, will you get to do it?

    The “fatigue factor” is the real issue. Can a director finish, strong, what they started?