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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

There were plenty of Stephen King fans who hoped to see the IT adaptation land on its feet. As one of his most beloved novels, seeing it actually hit the big screen in a hard R-rated form was a dream come true. But few could have realized just how much money the movie would make, and just how many non-Stephen King fans would have left the theaters satisfied.

But what was the real reason audiences loved it? Speaking with io9, director Andy Muschietti laid down his thoughts on the matter.

“I don’t think [audiences] quite expected such an emotional connection with the story. That’s what I take from, not only working on the movie, but the reactions. When I hear them, and I read them, people are very attached emotionally to the journey of these kids. Which is not really frequent for horror movies. It is a story that can be told without that fantastic element. It’s a story about a group of kids who are lonely and oppressed and they learn to get powerful by getting together. So the fantastic elements are sort of on the backburner and that’s why people connect [with it]. It’s a human story.”

Well, we can’t deny its impact. Off it’s $35 million budget, IT managed to take in over $630 million worldwide, with almost half of that number coming in from U.S. ticket sales. In an age where the foreign box office is ever-important, that is rare.

What do you think? What worked for you about the movie? Let us know your thoughts down below!

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SOURCE: io9

  • secretAGENTman

    Well said.

    When I care about the protagonists AND believe in the danger of the antagonist… It captivated one’s fully invested attention.

    Good for him, and I look forward to Part/Chapter/Book 2.

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.