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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

It sounds like the writers of CW’s The Flash are implementing a lot of things based on the weaknesses of Season 3. In addition to them NOT going for a Speedster villain this time around, they made the bold decision of introducing this season’s baddie, The Thinker, much earlier.

But why show their cards this early on in the game? A big part of what made the series what it is revolved around the mysteries surrounding their villain, right? Maybe not so much.

While at a press screening, executive producer Andrew Kreisberg said:

“It’s not just Flash but it’s a sort of like a constant problem for these kinds of shows about how much you reveal and how much do you hide the bad guy. One thing I think we might have done last season, we might have done a disservice to ourselves last season was we knew who Savitar was from the beginning and I think we waited too long to reveal it to the audience and we lost what I think could have been some valuable real estate exploring that, and so this season we wanted to just be cards up and reveal, ‘Here’s the bad guy at the end of Episode 1.’ And they’re gonna get on him fast, and this season we really worked on having a plan where trying to figure out who the villain is wasn’t what the issue was. The issue was we know who it is but how do we stop him. So that’s become more of this season, and again, I think it’s very easy to sort of fall back on our own writing tropes of sort of like hiding the ball for as long as can. We just thought this year, let’s do something different and play it more cards up. Now that they know it’s DeVoe, now it’s about figuring out which DeVoe it is and there’ll be a confrontation sooner rather than later.”

He’s got a point. Rather than try to replicate that same flavor we’ve had for a while, revealing the baddie up front allows us to really get to know him. Additionally, it’s probably better to show too much early on than to hold out for too long, long after the audience has gotten over the mystery aspect.

What do you think? Do you agree with Kreisberg? Let us know down below!

The Flash airs on Tuesdays on The CW at 8/7c.

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SOURCE: CinemaBlend

  • axebox

    Question: Why do the writers insist on making characters the villains on page 1?

  • Mr Smart

    Personally this notion of heroines and villains is, in and of itself, a sign of white privilege.

    It’s also very bigoted and racist, not to mention sexist. The notion ANY cis-white male be showcased in either a positive or masculine manner is literally the very definition of white male privilege.

    It’s the year 2017, Flash, it’s time to abandon the bigotry of the 1950s already.

    • KilliK’s mother

      Once again you let me down, Mr Smart. You have been very good at using the terms Womyn, Femayle, and Huindividual, in order to remove the yoke of the male terms, but then you come here and say “heroines”, which has the very triggering male-centric “hero” as a part of it. I expect our champion of all that is right and honorable to be able to come up with a much better word for the 21st century.

      For shame!

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.