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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

The Transformers franchise is in a bit of an odd place right now. After six movies, it finally seems like Paramount has discovered how to make a film that resonates with audiences. Bumblebee delivered exactly what many of them have been wanting to see for the past decade, with many fans wondering why it took so long for this to happen.

And that’s sort of the bad part about it. It took so long, and as such, there has been this downward momentum in terms of interest in the franchise. In spite of earning its best reviews yet, Bumblebee has made well under $190 million worldwide — which is quite the dropoff from its $1 billion-plus heyday of just a few years back (it’s even less than what the atrocious Transformers: The Last Knight did in theaters, and that movie was also a disappointment).

RELATED – Video: Bumblebee Finds A New Girl In Fifty Shades Mash-Up

But, in spite of this, one can’t help but wonder if screenwriter Christina Hodson knows where she’d like to take things in the future. She was asked this very question by Variety:

“I do. I know exactly what I wanna do with one. I don’t know if we’re gonna do it — we’ve got to see if audiences go and see this movie. But I know where I want to go with the next one.”

Again, as mentioned above, the future of the franchise seems uneasy. In most cases, the studio would wash their hands of this mess and move on, but hopefully, they understand that Bumblebee wasn’t the problem. It was a victim of at least four previous garbage movies that wore down audiences patience. Will they jump in and take the plunge for a Bumblebee 2? We’ll have to wait and see.

If nothing else, it does seem like Hodson understands the appeal of the core premise, as she reminisced to the outlet:

“In 2007, when Spielberg was doing the press tour for the first [Transformers] movie, I remember him saying that for him, Transformers was this very simple, very timeless notion of a boy and his car. I always thought that makes so much sense. I have very fond memories of when I was 12 and I got in my dad’s old BMW. I was washing it, and I remember turning the key in the ignition for the first time, and I wasn’t really meant to. You know that magical feeling when you’re a small person and you turn the key of this big hunk of metal? It just felt like the most magical, forgive me, but transformative thing. And I’ve always just loved the idea of taking that to the next level. Pretty early on, I knew I wanted to tell the story of two broken people who are healing each other. So the broken girl and the broken car kind of felt like a romantic notion.”

What did you think of Bumblebee and do you think it deserves a sequel? Let us know your thoughts down below!

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SOURCE: Variety

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.