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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

George Lucas may be the godfather of the Star Wars universe, but it certainly sounds like he has his fair share of quibbles when it comes to the actual filmmaking of the soon-to-be-released Star Wars: The Last Jedi.

RELATED – Star Wars: The Last Jedi Review – The Most Emotionally-Satisfying Film In The Saga To Date

As we know, this current trilogy of films brings back the tangible, practical elements that many of us fans fell in love with decades ago. Gone are the complete CG backgrounds that Lucas used in his prequel trilogy, and despite all the criticism he received for that approach, it sounds as though he still prefers that method, as production designer Rick Heinrichs revealed in an interview with THR.

“We went into Star Wars saying we’re going to do matte paintings and we’re going to be hanging miniatures. That’s the way we’re going to do this cause that’s what George would want. And of course George visited and he’s like, ‘Why are you building all these sets?’ ‘Well, because that’s what you like, isn’t it?’ He’s a cranky guy but his point is that for the big stuff, obviously planets, spaceships flying, when you’re not close enough to see actors in it, there isn’t much point anymore in actually building something.”

Of course, many fans have problems with that mindset from Lucas, and it seems to only bring with it. Interestingly enough, I’m surprised that Heinrichs didn’t realize that Lucas himself was more of a tech person than practical filmmaking one.

It would be more accurate to say they are going practical because that’s how Lucas did it at first. It was only later on when the technology allowed it that he quickly skewed more CG.

What do you think of Lucas’ comments? Let us know your thoughts down below!

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SOURCE: THR

  • Moby85

    The problem is that outside of vehicles and perhaps some city shots, CGI technology just isn’t there. Certainly not well-enough to do the things Lucas wanted to be done. His CGI is not only dated but looked bad when it came out: especially the CGI used in the special edition 90s re-releases.

    What’s more interesting is the public acknowledgement of Lucas as “cranky”.

  • Kindofabigdeal

    I could appreciate large sprawling settings to give you a sense of scope and wonder. But close ups and all the stuff with actors should be done on as much practical as you can. With just a touch of CGI that the average viewer won’t even notice.

  • TheOct8pus

    30 years ago, Lucas was an innovator and the king of Star Wars…today he’s just crazy uncle George, who shows up on the holidays and spouts crazy, crabby nonsense and then disappears for another year.

  • M@rvel

    So the title of this article implies that George Lucas said something specific about the use of practical sets in TLJ, but then you go on to read the article to find that there is no quote from George Lucas, there’s not even a mention of TLJ in the quote…… you think this is okay to do???

  • Nay sayer!

    The film was OK not great.

  • Victor Roa

    Yes, Lucas sounds like crazy old man, but I do often see his flaws as art school experimental film.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/de429de5d3afab14a77955c82c6893db0ebfdcf0be7e16dbd183cb39b6e61e2b.jpg

  • SaiyanHeretic

    Considering that, by Revenge of the Sith, damn near every scene was shot on a green screen with the scenery added in post, it seems like even just one actual set would be too much for Lucas these days.

  • Kevin Motionworkscinema Knight

    CGI sucks!! All of lucas prequels to Star Wars sucks because it was bloated with flimsy clunky CGI. Give me a reak world, set making movie any day!!!!!

  • Atirus

    Its funny he says that cause I thought the prequels had too many green screen sets!

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.