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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

While I personally loved practically every second of the two new trailers for Spider-Man: Homecoming (which, if you haven’t seen…what the hell’s the matter with you?!?), there’s a very strong sense that Marvel Studios really heavily wrapped itself around this new Spidey continuity. While I’m sure he’s only going to be in the film for a small fraction of its running time, Robert Downey Jr. practically walked away from the trailer looking like the star of the new Spider-Man movie.

From the heavy use of Tony Stark, to an entire segment dedicated to referencing The Avengers during a bank heist, the overriding message that Stark is heavily involved with shaping Peter Parker’s career as a crimefighter, and a money shot that features Spidey and Iron Man zipping around together, it’s profoundly obvious that Marvel Studios wants to convey to audiences that this is their Spider-Man, set firmly in their established world.

By contrast, if you look at the trailers for Marvel flicks like Doctor Strange and Guardians of The Galaxy Vol. 2, aside from the logo in the beginning, there’s little to nothing in them that tells the audience that they’re set in the same world as the Avengers saga. 

And, like I said, I don’t think that’s a bad thing. I’ve watched both the domestic and the international trailers for Spider-Man: Homecoming, and I see a film loaded with potential, with intriguing dynamics to explore and fun characters that I can’t wait to get to know better.

But I can see why some people are grumbling out there, and I’d like to give them a place to voice their concerns, as LRM is a home for all fanboys to get together and discuss everything that’s right and wrong with their favorite projects.

A commenter on our main post that contains the trailers wrote this:

“Looks awesome?! Hell no. Retooling Spider-Man into someone looked over by a tech billionaire completely changes everything. Spider-man was supposed to be relatable, *that* is what Spider-Man had going for it.

They’re destroying Spider-Man by lumping in Iron Man purely for the extra bucks it makes at the boxoffice.

We should’ve known they’re messing this up when they changed Aunt May into a milf.”

Another voiced that they had wished they could’ve made this movie without Robert Downey Jr. While they didn’t elaborate further than that, I assume that this person feels that his outsized Tony Stark is going to draw too much attention from the real star of Spider-Man: Homecoming.

If I put myself in the shoes of the dissenters out there, I can understand their disappointment. I don’t agree with it, per sé, but I can see it. Spider-Man is a beloved hero for millions of fans around the world, and these trailers so heavily place him under the thumb of Stark, and they put so much emphasis on promoting this as an MCU film, that it can make one long for a time before everything was one big sandbox and these iconic characters could simply stand on their own. 



Pretty sure I’d be just as ticked off if DC introduced a new movie about my guy (Superman) where Bruce Wayne is mentoring Clark Kent, and calling the shots on how he handles his heroic duties. 

So I’m going to take a step back here, since I personally had no problem with all of the MCU touches in these Homecoming trailers, and I’m just going to pose this question to you– our readers- and let you guys duke it out in the Comments below:

Was there too much of a Marvel Studios/MCU presence in the Spider-Man: Homecoming trailers?

Let us know your thoughts. I’ll see you in the Comments.

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.