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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

Perhaps more than any other period in film history, we have filmmakers who are influenced by the works that came before them. In decades past, you had filmmakers who created films about…life and the stories from it. These days, you more have filmmakers that try to capture the essence of those movies. Not that I’m complaining.

Like many other film writers out there, some of my favorite stuff is stuff that’s influenced by other movies, because they’re able to indulge and lean into the narrative tropes that helped shape my taste. If that’s your thing, then you may be in for a real treat for Missing Link. Our own Gig Patta had a chance to sit down with director Chris Butler, who went on to give his main influence for his new stop-motion flick:

“A long time ago, more than 15 years, I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if stop-motion had its own kind of hero?’ Kind of like an Indiana Jones of the stop-motion world. This movie is very much influenced by the movies I loved when I was a kid. Raiders of the Lost Ark, I was a Sherlock Holmes fan as well, so clearly there’s a lot of Sherlock Holmes in this. And also Ray Harryhausen creature features. So it’s kind of alike an amalgamation of those three passions from my childhood.”

RELATED – Missing Link Would Not Have Been Possible 10 Years Ago

I like the idea of stop-motion getting their own hero. In the grand scheme of things, the stop-motion medium isn’t nearly as widespread as 2D animation or CG animation, and the number of high adventure tales are limited. To give them that swashbuckling sort of feel is something we are indeed overdue for. I’m hopeful that Missing Link will help fill that void for us.

What do you think of Butler’s comments? Let us know your thoughts down below!

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SOURCE: LRM Online

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.