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– by Joseph Jammer Medina

Earlier this year, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild hit both the Nintendo Switch and Nintendo Wii U, and was met with near universal praise. From its overwhelmingly huge world map to its intuitive and flexible control scheme, there were many shining points to this revolutionary entry in the long-running franchise.

However, if there was one aspect of the game that sort of split fans, it was the music. For decades, fans had grown used to the high adventure score that really put you in the mood to explore the farthest reaches of a fantasy kingdom. With The Breath of the Wild being the franchise’s first foray into open world, many were let down that composers Manaka Kataoka and Yasuaki Iwata opted to go in a much different direction.

Rather than milk that spirit of adventure we’ve grown to expect, we were treated to a minimalist melancholic score. This also applied to the Hyrule Field theme, which consists pretty much exclusively of slow, sparse piano music.

While this isn’t really the kind of music that invigorates the human spirit, there is something else very magical about it. In a new video from the YouTube channel Game Score Fanfare, they defend the minimalist approach, not only to the Hyrule Field theme, but to the more minimalist approach Nintendo took with this score. All in all, it comes down to capturing the essence of the story and world, which revolves around a Hyrule that has been in ruins for a good century.

What do you think of the score, and do you agree with what this video had to say? Let us know your thoughts down below!

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SOURCE: Game Score Fanfare

  • Victor Roa

    That’s nice, but I actually let a 7 year old nephew hear SNES music and he said it was much better.

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and editor-in-chief of LRM. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.