Tabletop Game Review – Brikks

 

Brikks by Stronghold Games
Price: ~$20.00
Players:
1 to 4
Playtime:
20 to 30 minutes
Perfect for: Players who enjoy roll-and-write games with placement efficiency elements and a bit of luck.

Brikks is a game of optimal block stacking! Virtual tiles are falling from the sky (or the top of the sheet of paper in this case), and players must strategically organize them to score points and bonus abilities.

To begin Brikks, one to five players gets a gameboard sheet and a marker to record the placement of their descending blocks. On a turn, an individual rolls a d6 and a d4: the combination of the result determines which type of brick is “falling” onto their sheet, as well as its orientation. One reroll is permissible, but after that the block is coming down for all players, although some options are available— 1) obtained energy points can be spent to “rotate” the block; 2) at greater expense, place any block of their choosing; or 3) use a limited number of bombs to place no block. Players amass energy points for covering pre-placed colored dots with a matching color of brick; victory points are awarded depending on the number of spaces filled per line (with extra points for rows “higher” on the sheet); and bonus points come from fully completing multiple rows on a turn. Once all players are unable to place any more blocks, the game concludes and the person with the most victory points wins.

RELATED: Tabletop Game Review – Dizzle

What works in Brikks is the relatable concept and mechanic that has been well-tuned to fit a roll-and-write gaming structure. It’s nearly impossible not to cite the iconic Tetris as a clear inspiration and its adaptation works very well, especially due to well-conceived special abilities that take a small edge off the randomness factor. Brikks is incredible simply to teach and learn, which also makes it accessible to a wide array of player skill levels. And finally, games are completed relatively quickly so it doesn’t command a very large time commitment.

Players who prefer games with low degrees of luck may not enjoy Brikks as much as others. While there is certainly some strategy to creating an optimal gameboard/sheet, at the end of the day players are at the mercy of the rolled dice more often than not. As such, there exists a lack-of-control element that some individuals may find frustrating. Furthermore, Brikks is not all that forgiving—a misplaced block can close off future possibilities with a stroke of the marker given that unlike Tetris, you are unable to “slide” bricks into open spaces under overhangs.

Brikks is a continuation of the strong write-and-roll game line that Stronghold has been publishing in recent years. This latest title takes a beloved classic and successfully repurposes it into the tabletop medium in a way that provides fun for the whole family.

Recommended if you like: Dizzle, Encore!, Kingdomino Duel

Final Grade: A-

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Fox Troilo

Fox serves as an entertainment journalist in the Washington, D.C. When not covering cinematic news for LRM, he critiques films as a member of the Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association. Fox also has a Ph.D. in Higher Education and Strategy from Indiana University Bloomington.

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