How M. Night Shyamalan Judges The Quality Of His Movies

M. Night Shyamalan speaking at the 2018 San Diego Comic Con International, for “Glass”, at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, California. Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore.

M. Night Shyamalan speaking at the 2018 San Diego Comic Con International, for “Glass”, at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, California. Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore.

As much as filmmakers often try to create films for their own personal reasons and gratification, there’s no doubt that they also like audiences to enjoy their movies. They can be the most artistic filmmaker in the world, and on some level, they still hope to please people and entertain them in some way. Such is the case for M. Night Shyamalan, a man who built his career on horror-thrillers and was once being called the next Steven Spielberg.

Shyamalan’s career has had plenty of ups and downs in the years since he first appeared on the scene. In some ways, it seemed as though he became a bit too full of himself and didn’t surround himself with enough people to question him. Still, it does sound as though he has a pretty solid way of determining the quality of his films, as he revealed to Seth Meyer.

RELATED – M. Night Shyamalan’s Next Three Films Are Not Connected

“So, you screen the first cut of the movie, and it’s really long,” Shyamalan told the host. “It has like, everything in it. It’s not paced correctly. And about 50 people will go to the bathroom during the screening of the movie. They’ll just get up and go at some point in the movie. And as you make the movie and you keep on doing it, then 30 people go to the bathroom. And the time next it’s 20 people, and then 10 people, then 4 people. And then the last cut of the movie when it’s ready to go out, its 2 people and they’re running, and they’re backwards watching the screen as they go to the bathroom. And what’s really interesting is that you stop thinking about yourself when you’re completely connected to the movie. And like 500 people forget they needed to go to the bathroom.”

It seems like a pretty solid way to figure things out, but it obviously isn’t fool-proof. For example, I appreciated what Glass did, as it was a superhero movie only Shyamalan could have made. But, at the end of the day, most critics and audiences seemed sort of underwhelmed and meh by the whole thing.

But what do you think? Is this the best way to approach editing your movie? Let us know your thoughts down below!

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SOURCE: Late Night (via Cinema Blend)

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Joseph Jammer Medina

Joseph Jammer Medina is an author, podcaster, and contributor at LRM Online. A graduate of Chapman University's Dodge College of Film and Television, Jammer's always had a craving for stories. From movies, television, and web content to books, anime, and manga, he's always been something of a story junkie.

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