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– by Emmanuel Gomez

It seems like until a film gets put into production, everything in the DCEU is a giant question mark. One of the films that has been talked about a lot is the solo Flash film, but it has had a tough road. Last January Warner Bros. had signed Spider-Man: Homecoming writers John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein to helm the film, replacing Rick Famuyiwa who left the project over creative differences.

Production on the Flash film was said to start sometime in March even though the film has never received a formal green light or a release date. But sources have told Variety that Warner Bros. will be pushing back the start of production sometime late 2019, meaning that we won’t be seeing a Flash film in theaters until sometime in 2021. The reason?

This is starts with the fact that the script is still being worked on and Warner Bros. does not think that it will have enough time to get it finished in time for the film to make its original start date. This is a problem because the star of The Flash, Ezra Miller, also has a key supporting role in Fantastic Beasts. The third film of that franchise will begin shooting in July, which would cause scheduling conflicts.

So with that the studios decided to push The Flash back. This was probably an easy decision given how popular the Harry Potter and it’s spin-off films have been and the disappointment that Justice League was even making them reevaluate their approach to making future films based on DC Comics characters. Currently we are a few months away from the release of Aquaman and next year we’ll see a Wonder Woman sequel. Also there is a Joker film in production and we all know about the Suicide Squad sequel that James Gunn has been brought on to write and possibly direct.

Is this disappointing news for you? Let us know in the comment section below!

ALSO SEE: FANTASTIC BEASTS 2 COMPARED TO THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK

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Source: Variety