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– by Nick Doll

Are you a giant Arrested Development fan, but Season 4 got you down? Can you not wait until Season 5, with a more classic story structure? Want something to cheer you up until then?

Today, Arrested Development Creator Mitch Hurwitz wrote a message, to announce two exciting updates about Arrested Development and Netflix. Take a read for yourself!

First, a premiere date for Arrested Development Season 5 is on the horizon. It seems Netflix has a shorter turnaround than ever between announcing a release date and putting something out, it will drop no later than July, if not June. Maybe expect an announcement on Cinco de Quatro?

Second, and here is the more exciting part because we have only heard rumors of this project up to this point, but Mitch Hurwitz has recut Season 4 to function like a regular season of Arrested.

For those not in the know, Season 4 had an odd structure, with each episode featuring primarily one main Bluth family member. Together, the episodes worked as a type of puzzle, and a rewarding one at that.

RELATED: Ron Howard Begins Voice Work For Arrested Development Season 5

But, as with anything, fans were upset with the change, so the new Arrested Development Season 4 Remix: Fateful Consequences will be gracing your Netflix account, this Friday, or as the Bluth’s know it, Cinco de Quatro.

The 15 episode season will become a full 22-episode run with classic interwoven stories. Though the Netflix episodes could be longer than the Fox versions, unused footage and possibly reshoots had to be used to inflate the episode count. We’ve heard already that if this project were to ever happen, new Ron Howard narration would be required, so he must of done that when he recorded for Season 5.

Are you excited for Arrested Development Season 4 Remix: Fateful Consequences, coming out this Friday? Or did you like the season the way it was? Let us know in the comment section below!

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SOURCE: Mitch Hurwitz